Archives for posts with tag: William Wordsworth

We had a great turnout for the first of our fall 2017 season on September 12, where we examined poetry and Commemoration. 

Abigail began the circle with Jacqueline Woodson’s “Occasional Poem,” in which a student responds to a teacher’s assignment, “I guess them arguing/on a Tuesday in January’s an occasion/So I guess this is an occasional poem.” Although an occasional poem is another word for a commemorative poem, this one was not written for a traditional public event.

Roger read Marc Antony’s famous speech, “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears,” from William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, a work that starts as a commemorative oration but ends as an incitement to riot: “Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—/For Brutus is an honourable man;/So are they all, all honourable men—/Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.”

Hazel read William Wordsworth’s “Composed upon Westminster Bridge,” a poem that commemorates or remembers London before sunrise, “The river glideth at his own sweet will:/Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;/And all that mighty heart is lying still!”

Gail read a shortened version of Yevgeni’s Yevtushenko’s “Babi Yar,” a poem that became a monument commemorating an horrific event, “No monument stands over Babi Yar./A steep cliff only, like the rudest headstone./I am afraid./Today, I am as old/As the entire Jewish race itself.”

Christiana read “Grand Central” by Billy Collins, which reads in its entirety:

The city orbits around eight million
centers of the universe
and turns around the golden clock
at the still point of this place.

Lift up your eyes from the moving hive
and you will see time circling
under a vault of stars and know
just when and where you are.

Linda read “Villanelle for an Anniversary” by Seamus Heaney, composed about the founder of Harvard University, “Begin again where frosts and tests were hard./Find yourself or founder. Here, imagine/A spirit moves, John Harvard walks the yard,/The books stand open and the gates unbarred.”

Eileen read Primo Levi’s “Shema” in which he substitutes knowledge of the holocaust for the well-known Jewish prayer, “Consider that this has been:/I commend these words to you./Engrave them on your hearts.”

Terry read “The Dogwood Tree” by Curtis Moorman, a poem she announced was not very good but that intrigued her because the author wrote prolifically from jail, “Legend says of the Dogwood tree/That on it, Christ was crucified/His blood was shed for you and me/When the soldier pierced His side.”

Vincent read “Normandy, the Impossible Made Possible,” a poem he had written and published describing the landing of the Allies, “Into the face of death, they forged our destiny,/Changing the course of history.”

Maria read William Wordsworth’s “Daffodils,” which examines how a scene can be remembered, “For oft, when on my couch I lie/In vacant or in pensive mood,/They flash upon that inward eye/Which is the bliss of solitude;/And then my heart with pleasure fills,/And dances with the daffodils.”

AnnaLee completed the circle with Mary Jo Bang’s “The Role of Elegy,” which describes a type of commemorative poem, and explores the poet’s difficulty memorializing her son’s death: “The role of elegy is/To put a death mask on tragedy,/A drape on the mirror.”

Scott couldn’t make the meeting but found a poem celebrating an event in the Boer War, which included the lines:

They went across the veldt,
As hard as they could pelt.

Like much of commemorative poetry, these lines are awful. Unfortunately great poetry cannot usually be composed on command.

We look forward to the poems you bring for Poetry and Punctuation. As a reminder, OPPC is not for reading poems you have written, but an opportunity to appreciate well-established poets. 

Find a poem! Show up! Read a poem! Discuss a poem!

Fall 2017 Schedule

October 17: Poetry and Punctuation
November 14: Poetry and Power
December 12: Poetry and Windows

Abigail Burnham Bloom and
AnnaLee Wilson

The One Page Poetry Circle is sponsored by the New York Public Library and is open to all. St. Agnes Branch Library is handicap accessible.

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Date: Tuesday, October 14
Time: 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. 

Place: St. Agnes Branch Library, 444 Amsterdam Avenue (near 81st Street), 3rd Floor 
Theme: Poetry and the Ode

Join the One Page Poetry Circle on October 14 to discuss Poetry and the Ode.

What is an ode? Basically it is a poem that expresses personal emotions while Pedestalreflecting on a being or thing of significance to the poet. The ode is one of the oldest forms of poetry, and was originally a poem with a complex stanza form accompanied by music. Odes of the ancient Greeks contained a strophe, antistrophe, and epode which refer to the rhythmical patterns of the text. The strophe and the antistrophe were sung by the chorus on opposites sides of the stage, and the antistrophe provided a conclusion somewhere in the middle. The Pindaric ode consists of three sections with irregular line lengths and rhyme patterns and celebrated gods or events such as the Olympics. The Romans wrote odes as lyrical poems of a more personal nature. The Horatian ode is calmer and less formal than the Greek and not written for a stage performance. The more modern English or Irregular ode, written in a freer style, makes no attempt to follow the traditional form although it sometimes retains the three-part structure.

The ode was popular among British Romantic poets, who looked at the world and saw themselves. William Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood” contrasts his state of mind as a child with his current depression. Where once the world appeared to him with “the glory and the freshness of a dream,” he finds that those visions have fled and concludes:

Though nothing can bring back the hour 
Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower; 
We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind

Although Wordsworth’s subject matter is modern in that he examines his own beliefs, he keeps the traditional structure of a contrast of two viewpoints and a resolution. More recent odes are often a celebration of an object, such as Max Mendelsohn’s “Ode to Marbles”:

I love the sound of marbles
scattered on the worn wooden floor,
like children running away in a game of hide-and-seek.
I love the sight of white marbles,
blue marbles,
green marbles, black,
new marbles, old marbles,
iridescent marbles,
with glass-ribboned swirls,
dancing round and round.
I love the feel of marbles,
cool, smooth,
rolling freely in my palm,
like smooth-sided stars
that light up the worn world.

In Mendelsohn’s ode the three-part structure celebrates the sound, sight, and feel of marbles.

To add a comment about odes, or post one you like, click the small speech balloon next to this blog post headline and follow the prompts. We look forward to your thoughts.