OPPC_Nov04_PoliticsJoin the One Page Poetry Circle on Election Day, November 4 to discuss Poetry and Politics.

Even when poems are not directly about politics, they are imbued with it as a poem expresses the author’s view of the world and how it should be. In the poems that follow, two great poets present their visions of America. In Walt Whitman’s “I Hear America Singing,” the poet celebrates the people of our country through the glorification of labor:

I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear;
Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and
        strong;
The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,
The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off
        work;
The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand
        singing on the steamboat deck;
The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as
        he stands;
The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning,
        or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;
The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or
        of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to
        her, and to none else;
The day what belongs to the day—At night, the party of young
        fellows, robust, friendly,
Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.

In response to Whitman’s view, Langston Hughes wrote “I, Too” in which he reminds the reader of those America left out:

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America

Although we may be disgusted with our politicians, we are proud of our democracy in which all can contribute to the solving of our problems.

Click on the speech balloon next to the subject of this blog post and send us your own thoughts or poems on the subject of Poetry and Politics. Or any another other poetry subject!

While you are thinking, mark November 4th on your calendars for the next One Page Poetry Circle. 

Date: Tuesday, November 4
Time: 5:30 – 6:30 pm
Place: St. Agnes Branch Library, 444 Amsterdam Avenue (near 81st Street), 3rd Floor
Theme: Poetry and Politics

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